Saturday, February 12, 2011

Fridge Philosophy—Part One

When I married my husband over 32 years ago, I began buying t-shirts and/or sweatshirts as mementos of our travels. Fifteen years later, I was overwhelmed with too many of both. So I switched to fridge magnets. Not only was this more challenging (to find THE perfect trinket/magnet for posterity), but, obviously, significantly cheaper.

We have two and a half refrigerators. One is in our kitchen—like you thought it might be in our bedroom. One—a very plain one (no bells and/or whistles!)—is in my pantry/utility/laundry room. And we have a “baby” fridge in our Barn apartment. I’m not allowed to display anything on our kitchen fridge. My husband made this rule when we built our home. Probably because it can get out of hand (see picture—this is approximately one-eighth of the area covered in “art" on my utility room fridge).

image via TLC's iPhone

I see my favorite magnets every day—sometimes six to eight times a day—as the utility fridge is mostly filled with water and drinks. I can tell a story about each magnet,  sometimes get kind of teary. Or I can stand there for a few brief moments, contemplating the messages that tickle or inspire me.

My three oldest—they are 25 to 32 years old—are:

Kiss my grits (simple and to the point and something we all learned from Flo on Alice, remember? I use it—frequently. It’s so much nicer than other possible phrases I could/should not use);

image via TLC's iPhone

A little bitty blackboard (even has a little itty bitty piece of chalk) that says:
I’d take a tranquilizer if I could get my teeth unclenched (true when I bought it, true at this very moment);

And a teeny tin can that says:
Butter Boy Sur-Nut Popcorn. I don’t really remember Butter Boy popcorn. I don’t know what a sur-nut is. I just love butter. (Me and my hubby’s crush—Paula Deen.) And popcorn. I’ve had this magnet for about 31 years. Hence, it’s vintage. TLC and I heart “vintage.”

My next oldest magnets—these are 20 to 24 years old—are:  

A 3-inch picture of TLC at about three years old—standing in the living room of a home we lived in for over 22 years. A home we loved. She has a sweet little dress on, a big Cheshire Cat grin on her face, and a Dorothy Hamill haircut (clearly beats the “flat” hairdo on our Blog, although I’d guess it was WAY out of style at that time);

A little Maxine magnet-memo pad that says:
Butts to kick . . .names to take (Julia Sugarbaker and TLC would need this one, wouldn’t they?);

And another Hallmark magnet that says:
Please do NOT touch the top of appliance—IMPORTANT dust-settling measurement in progress. That pretty much sums up my housekeeping abilities.

The magnets I love the most in this area of the fridge say:

“In raising my children, I have lost my mind BUT found my Soul.”
                                    --Lisa T. Shepherd

With the time and energy we’ve spent dieting we COULD have built a small FAT-LOVING CIVILIZATION.

These two were purchased at (yes, you guessed it!) a Hallmark store. The second one doesn’t show the author of the quote. Probably one of those creative Hallmark peeps whose talents for writing have allowed me to participate in Laughter Therapy for over 33 years. (Seriously, are you having a bad day? Find a Hallmark store—or go to a Walgreen's to their card aisle. Stand there and start reading! Especially the Shoebox or Connections cards. Try NOT to laugh and feel better. You won’t be able to do it.)

And, finally,

You know it was a good day if you didn’t HIT or BITE anyone.
                                    --Nathaniel Farizek, age 4

image via TLC's iPhone

Such amazing wisdom at age FOUR. Wow.

Fridge Philosophy---Part Two? Coming soon. I know you’ll be waiting with great anticipation.

ta-ta for now . . .

p.s.—PLEASE don’t hit or bite anyone.

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